Project launched to reduce lamb losses

A major new project is being launched in Wales in a bid to cut lamb losses.

Red meat promotion agency, Hybu Cig Cymru, is seeking to recruit 50 farms to monitor losses over the coming year in irder to see if there is a common pattern.

“We hope that with the help of flocks drawn from across Wales we can identify the main causes of lamb losses and by doing so provide farmers with advice and support to help minimise similar losses the following season,” says John Richards, HCC’s industry information officer.

“The number of lambs sold or retained for breeding per ewe is still one of the most important single factors which affects the productivity of sheep flocks.

“Any loss of lambs prior to sale or maturity has a major impact on the profitability and viability of farms.”

The project - to be launched at next week’s Royal Welsh Winter Fair - will collect basic information at scanning, lambing and during the post-lambing period so that a baseline can be established for flocks across Wales.

The financial impact losses can then be determined and advice and support tailored to help farms reduce the impact on profitability.

Each participating farm will get an individual report and advice on how to minimise lamb losses in their flock.

“Invitations are extended to all sheep farms in Wales so that hill, upland and lowland, pedigree and commercial flocks can take part,” added Mr Richards.

“They can then help us build a realistic picture of how the scale and causes of lamb losses in Wales compare to the rest of the UK.

“We aim to make the recording process as easy as possible with much of the information being collected with the help of an HCC pocket notebook.”

●Aberystwyth-based Innovis will be delivering the project on HCC’s behalf, with details available on 01970 828236 by email at enquiries@innovis.org.uk or visit the HCC website at www.hccmpw.org.uk

Have your say

Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory
Register your email address for Farmers Guardian e-bulletins

Get the latest from Farmers Guardian delivered straight to your inbox. Click here to sign-up today

Already receiving bulletins? Sign-in to edit your preferences