Monsanto pulls GM crops out of Europe

MONSANTO will no longer push for approvals for the cultivation of GM crops in Europe and will instead focus on imports of biotech crops into the EU.

The company said the move would impact all its pending applications except for MON 810.

A spokesman said biotech crops were ‘highly successful’ in the rest of the world and therefore it needed to concentrate on expanding those markets.

It comes after BASF last year pulled out of Europe due to a lack of acceptance over GM.

At the time, BASF said it made ‘no’business sense’ to continue investing in products exclusively for cultivation in this market.

GM Freeze welcomed the move but said it was now down to supermarkets, animal feed manufacturers and farmers to ‘drop our heavy dependence on imported GM soya to feed livestock and poultry’.

Pete Riley of GM Freeze said: “It has taken a long time for the penny to drop that trying to force failing GM technology onto an unwilling market it is simply not good business, and we hope other companies will follow suit – but EU GM imports are still a problem.

“There is now a real opportunity for Europe to push ahead with farming that is sustainable, based on reducing dependencies on agrochemicals and adopting time-tested practices like  crop rotation and biological control of pests.

“Policies, financial incentives and research and development all need to shift in this direction.”

Readers' comments (8)

  • Another decision that will hold back European farmers and create agricultural inflation, and increasing the price of food. The best solution for the countryside is to use GM and cut out pesticides.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • The best solution is no GM and no pesticides, i'll pay more for my food!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • It is inevitable that Monsanto would not want to waste more money investing in the EU. Minority NGO groups have ensured that the most exiting safe new technology since the wheel has been banished from Europe. It is perhaps good that research resources that will make food production environmentally friendly and more cost effective should be aimed at the more deserving and less opinionated peoples of the developing world.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I would welcome a EU that fed itself instead of being a major competitor with poor, import-dependent countries. Whether that is actually possible is another question, particularly when the region won't give its farmers all the tools they need.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Evidence that GM technology has had a long term beneficial effect on yields, or on reducing chemical usage is hard to come by if you discount that coming from or financed by the holders of the patents. Increasing their profits takes precedence over any altruistic motive.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • A NON A MOOSE
    We don't need Monsanto, some areas of their activites are corrupt and questionable!
    http://monsantofacts.com/whoismonsanto/

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anon 26th 4:32pm
    That would describe 98% of human kind.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Fantastic news that GM gets no backing. We will probably see it's bad effects sometime soon. We all need to become ecologically literate & understand what the balance is between human needs and ecosystems. It's proved that even on the poorest lands we can work with Nature and get greater, more diverse, disease resistant food yields. We should all educate ourselves in the basics of permanent agricultural principles if we are to become sustainable farmers - very interesting You Tube clips on permaculture & a video called Farms for the Future is a good start.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory
Register your email address for Farmers Guardian e-bulletins

Get the latest from Farmers Guardian delivered straight to your inbox. Click here to sign-up today

Already receiving bulletins? Sign-in to edit your preferences